PATTERN PULP

Friday Quick Links!

April 22nd, 2016

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1. Guiseppe Pepe’s “Losing my Mind” project via Yatzer
2. Interview with painter Sarah Kelk via The Design Files
3. Lovely DIY paper peonies via design*sponge
4. Suddenly craving a letter board via Miss Moss
5. Loving Inès Longevial’s use of color via Design Crush
6. Wanting to cover myself in Tattly’s scented perennials via swissmiss
7. Bold & quirky tiles from Edward Barber & Jay Osgerby for Mutina via design-milk
8. A peek inside Harvard’s collection of 2500 pigments via Colossal
9. Zoe Bradley’s amazing paper flower chandeliers via Honestly WTF
10. Merging illustration with street photography via Creative Boom
11. Talking with artist Sarah Gee Miller via The Jealous Curator
12. Beautiful hand-colored samurai photos via Trendland

Contributed by Emily Gup

Friday Quick Links!

April 15th, 2016

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1. Loving Irina Kruglova’s illustration style via Creative Boom
2. Interview with needlework artist Liz Payne via The Design Files
3. Ewa Juszkiewicz is giving history a new face via Trendland
4. Yes, please, to dotted leaves via oh joy!
5. Mysterious stacks of books left around NYC via swissmiss
6. Nadine Ijewere explores cultures through identity and fashion via design*sponge
7. Beautiful fallen tree bench via iGNANT
8. Stained glass furniture! via design-milk
9. Dorris Vooijs’ lovely layered mixed media works via Design Crush
10. Laureen Marchand’s striking paintings of dying flowers via The Jealous Curator
11. Amazing rainbow origami street art via Colossal
12. James Reka’s cubist inspired paintings via hi-fructose

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

April 13th, 2016

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This week’s artists explore impact of chaos and mythology on their art creation.

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1. Keiichi Tanaami’s Visible Darkness/Invisible Darkness contains powerful images drawn from dreams and memories, most notably those from his experiences as a child during World War II at Sikkema Jenkins & Co
2. Aaron Morse’s various landscapes depict survival amidst a harsh ecology, the strangeness of inherited mythologies, and perspectives obtained from a distance at ACME
3. Franz Ackermann seeks to chronicle new urban realities and the ways in which they are perceived, at a time when both realities and perceptions are driven by ceaseless flows of tourists and information. His monumental paintings take the form of large exploded views that combine architectural elements with numerous Modernist references and abstract shapes in a burst of colors and materials at Galerie Daniel Templon
4. Dave McDermott continues his ongoing allegorical examination of the complexities of human nature and the societies we build to house them, the isolation inherent in those structures, and how we represent those ideas through art itself at Brenna Griffin
5. Erik Jones challenges viewers to see beauty in his chaotic, mixed-media works that merge nude subjects with nonrepresentational, abstract elements. Describing the human figures in his compositions as “aesthetic anchors,” they are the calming foreground upon which bursts of color, stenciled shapes and custom-made stickers create surreal landscapes at Jonathan Levine Gallery
6. Hope Gangloff is known for creating vibrant and truthful portraits of her friends as a way to share her view of modern American life. By capturing this generation of young adults in her illustrations and paintings, she documents this era’s struggle during these tumultuous times at Richard Heller Gallery

Friday Quick Links!

April 8th, 2016

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1. Alessandro Mendini designed rugs for Joseph Carini Carpets via design-milk
2.Human consciousness explored through repurposed wood via Colossal
3. Digging the use of color and pattern in this Australian home via The Design Files
4. Minju Kim’s playful world of fashion via Style Bubble
5. DIY candy gems via Poppytalk
6.Chloe Sells’ psychedelic photography series via Creative Boom
7. A fun colorful and glittery DIY via Oh Joy!
8. Interview with artist Nike Schroeder via The Jealous Curator
9. Rodrigo Branco has turned his visual impairment into art via hi-fructose
10. Tips to add pizazz to your raffia summer hat via Honestly WTF
11. Loving all of the works from Kristin Sim’s You Are Here via Miss Moss
12. Neon geometry as escapism via AnOther Mag

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

April 5th, 2016

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This week’s artists investigate the human tendency to collect and the subsequent impact on our environment.

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1. Crystal Wagner’s water influenced installation Surface Tension at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art
2. Hassan Sharif ‘s tapestry-like works in this exhibition are conceptually linked by their relationship with the human body and social structures. Recently, Sharif has centered his production around large-scale wall sculptures that incorporate objects that, as he describes, “people depend on greatly to keep up with their daily routines and activity. So long as they are alive, they keep using, exhausting, and relying on them as if they are, in one way or another, part of their own bodies.” at Alexander Gray Associates
3. Tony Tasset has said his goal was to create a universal logo that expressed the contemporary environment of chronic evaluation—a graphic emblem of trending at Kavi Gupta
4. In Dents and Abrasions we find John Divola renegotiating the territory of Vandalism. Here we find abandoned dwellings, located at the edge of human existence, and found to be in decrepit and dysfunctional condition at Gallery Luisotti
5. Rosanne Ebner ‘s Joie De Vivre “pays homage to the natural world, representing the power of regeneration through nourishment and the ability to procreate instead of consuming through greed. The neglect of today’s world is ruining the balance of a deeply symbiotic relationship with nature.  This disconnection needs to be addressed so we can revive the relationship with our natural world and safeguard the future survival of the species” at Ashok Jain Gallery
6. Gregory Euclide’s “Extract” cultivates a quiet presence of human intervention in each rendered environment at Hashimoto Contemporary

Friday Quick Links!

April 1st, 2016

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1. Terrarium lamps! via Colossal
2. Emmanuelle Moureaux’s paper hanging forest via hi-fructose
3. Interview with artist Yvette Coppersmith via The Design Files
4. Gorgeous hand-carved silver bookmarks via Creative Boom
5. Oscar Oiwa’s immersive drawing via Yatzer
6. Turn unwanted plastic into usable objects with these DIY machines via design-milk
7. Chatting with Andrea D’Aquino via The Jealous Curator
8. Traditional ‘tansu’ chests become modern trolley cases via designboom
9. Digging the new kantha quilts from Block Shop Textiles via design*sponge
10. Maya Freelon Asante’s bold color choices in her 3-d works via design crush
11. Sweet, simple graphic prints from Jorey Hurley via Miss Moss
12. Love these hanging tree sculptures from Jorge Mayet via trendland

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

March 29th, 2016

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This week’s artists use shape to evoke deeper thought and play.

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1. Raoul De Keyser’s subtly evocative paintings appear at once abstract and figurative. Made up of simple shapes and marks, they invoke spatial and figural illusions, yet remain elusive of any descriptive narrative at David Zwirner
2. Hans Hofmann’s famous phrase “push and pull” is most often associated with the Abstract Expressionist painter’s signature works of the 1950s and 1960s, in which bold color planes emerge from and recede into energetic surfaces of intersecting and overlapping shapes. Employing color, plane, and space, Hofmann sought to achieve creative expression that paralleled nature at BAMPFA
3. Tom Hackney has created geometric abstractions based on the movement of pieces in games of chess. In the case of the present exhibition, they are games played by the celebrated French artist and chess player, Marcel Duchamp at Francis M. Naumann Fine Art
4. A retrospective of at textile artist and interior designer Alexander Girard’s oeuvre Vitra Design Museum
5. Gabriel de la Mora’s art practice subverts function through contemplative and systematic modes of enquiry. For De la Mora, art is neither created nor destroyed, only transformed. The artist collects materials that have been discarded after their manufactured function ceases to exist, and these form the basis of his two- and three-dimensional works at Timothy Taylor
6. Karen Carson’s seminal Zippers series at Rosamund Felson

Friday Quick Links!

March 25th, 2016

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1. A pretty paper daffodil tutorial via design*sponge
2. Owen Gent explores modern resurrection via Trendland
3. Studio Oddness plays with bubbles via design-milka
4. Resin and marble combine to create Lagoon tables via Colossal
5. Visiting with Jen Stark in her studio via Electrify Mag
6. Wanting all of Rachel Sender’s quirky character pots via Creative Boom
7. Interview with illustrator Eamon Donnelly via The Design Files
8. Lisa Smirnova’s beautiful “Artist at Home” embroidery series via Design Crush
9. Marianne Batlle meticulously beaded, fabulously quirky pins via Miss Moss
10. A South Korean design collective that turns trash to treasure via Sight Unseen
11. Swooning over the colors in Charlotte Evans’ paintings via The Jealous Curator
12. A DIY living art wall via Oh Joy!

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

March 22nd, 2016

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This week’s artists take things apart to put them back together.

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1. In drawing from the urban storefront and its familiar yet overlooked signage, Brice Bischoff’s installation of photographic and architectural structures, videos and fiberglass sculptures considers how the experience of place is shaped by way of light, reflection and architecture at Cirrus Gallery
2. Jason Middlebrook’s signature towering “Plank” paintings are geometric abstractions painted directly onto internally cut trunks from the local mill in Hudson New York. Middlebrook’s signature patterning weds the geometry of modern abstraction with the lines of wood grain to “create a tension between something organic and something man-made.” at Gallery 16
3. WILDSCAPES examines two distinguished artistic approaches to depictions of nature, with a focus on ecological (dis)balance between the natural and the man made world. By utilizing different materials, aesthetic approaches and iconographies, Ivan Stojakovic and Paula Winokur deliver compelling takes on wilderness and its fragility and/or pertinence within contemporary cultural context. They reinvent the notion of the sublime, dwell on the ways both nature and culture are fabricated, contemplate on their coexistence and clashes, and call for reflection on the existential and ecological issues of our times at Christian Duvernois Gallery
4. Arman’s Accumulations features around forty historical sculptures produced between 1960 and 1964. In his quest to construct an ‘archaeology of the present’, Arman created an artistic language that had a deep-reaching effect on contemporary art. The Accumulations explore the loss of individual identity and the neutralization of human interactions by consumer society, the violence of abundance and the aesthetics of rubbish at Galerie Daniel Templon
5. Extending and intensifying the method of image making (and unmaking) that he has employed for a decade, John Sparagana has spent the last two years deep in the comics, with very serious results. His most ambitious and accomplished work to date, the Themesong Variation works, which are technically cut paper collage of 1/8-inch squares mixed and laid down onto Dibond aluminum, open a whole new universe of potential for image intervention and reinvention at Corbett vs. Dempsey
6. Roddy Wildeman sees beauty in distressed and damaged surfaces and works solely with materials fitting that description. The two main focuses of Wildeman’s work are historic preservation and sustainability. He collects wood from a majority of buildings that are over one-hundred years old and have a legacy of sentimental value attached to them.Everything that enters his studio gets incorporated into a phase of his process and his studio functions at a 100% sustainable level. Committed to his social responsibility to reuse and recycle, Wildeman views his practice as an effort to preserve our environment at Jonathan Levine Gallery

Friday Quick Links!

March 18th, 2016

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1. Okuda San Miguel transformed this abandoned Moroccan church via Colossal
2. DIY succulent sand art terrarium via Honestly WTF
3. A fan of Kirkland Bray’s collages via The Jealous Curator
4. Charles Clary’s drywall and wallpaper installations via iGNANT
5. The artistry of African Masking via AnOther
6. Talking with Loly Ghirardi about her beautiful embroidery via Poppytalk
7. Curating the nude via Miss Moss
8. Loving these Indian interiors via design*sponge
9. Loving the latest home goods from Bonnie and Neil via The Design Files
10. In the studio of Paul Wackers via Sight Unseen
11. Abstract rugs inspired by biology via design-milk
12. Solar spectrum art installations in Rome via Trendland

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

March 15th, 2016

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In this week’s gallery picks, women play the narrative.

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1. Susanna Bauer and Leigh Anne Lester’s muses are the found fallen leaves, and the buds of flowers that haven’t fully grown.  Marrying both human and nature again, their work is a tribute to nature at Muriel Guépin Gallery
2. Carrie Moyer’s Sirens explores and extends the legacy of American Abstraction while paying homage to many of its seminal female figures among them Helen Frankenthaler, Elizabeth Murray, and Georgia O’Keeffe. In Moyer’s compositions color is the sole character, playing every role: energy, matter, ooze, architecture, the cosmic and the cosmos. Through her use of gravity, velocity and stasis Moyer transforms and frees vivid primary hues to express new kinds of animation or fullness, which in turn propels Moyer’s ongoing exploration of her medium at DC Moore Gallery
3. Anna Elise Johnson collects official photographs taken during meetings between the leaders of the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, the U.S. State Department and various heads of state undergoing structural adjustment. Johnson’s acrylic sculptures structurally readjust the photographs that represent, support and solidify these imperial operations. at The Mission
4. Through nearly 100 works made by 34 artists over the past seventy years, this ambitious exhibition traces ways in which women have changed the course of art by deftly transforming the language of sculpture since the postwar period at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel
5. In new paintings and collages, Karen Kilimnik creates richly enigmatic narratives, inscribing her images with signifiers that obliquely reference histories of representation and myth. Mining the vernacular of tapestry reproductions of Baroque and Renaissance painting imagery, Kilimnik doubles down on the expressive potential of the reproduction, rendering her scenes with patchy brushwork and sprinkling her finished paintings with glitter, or adorning them with selections culled from from her library of idiomatic imagery at 303 Gallery
6. JOAN BROWN HERSELF is a survey of eleven self-portraits made between 1970 and 1980, the period during which Brown firmly established herself as an artist with a unique vision at CB1 Gallery

Friday Quick Links!

March 11th, 2016

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1. Dorothy O’Connor’s gorgeous installations via Creative Boom
2.. The impressive work and life of Lillian Orlowsky via design*sponge
3. Chatting with artist Rebecca Leveille via Hi-Fructose
4. These knotted cushions and stools look like so much fun via design-milk
5. Kidswear by Bobo Choses that we wish came in adult sizes via Miss Moss
6. A visit with Misha Kahn in his studio via Sight Unseen
7. Why not decoupage your Easter Eggs this year? via Poppytalk
8. Mar Cerdà’s miniatures made from watercolor painted paper via Honestly WTF
9. In love with Anna Collette Hunt’s ceramic insects via Colossal
10. Spencer Harrison explores Synesthesia in his latest works via The Design Files
11. Anne Siems’ beautiful and ethereal paintings via The Jealous Curator
12. Ori Gersht’s captivating On Reflection via Design Crush

Contributed by Emily Gup

Welcome! I’m Shayna.
I live in New York and curate Pattern Pulp Studios. We're trend forecasters connecting the dots between culture and commerce, helping companies navigate digital and physical opportunities. This blog gives a daily taste of what we're seeing. If you want to learn more about how we can help your brand, or just to say hello, drop us a line - we'd love to hear from you!
 
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