PATTERN PULP

Friday Quick Links!

February 26th, 2016

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1. The amazing tiled ceilings of centuries old mosques via Colossal
2. Turning freighter trucks into mobile art via design boom
3. Alexandra Kehayoglou’s creation of a magical fashion runway via Honestly WTF
4. Digging the way Erika Emerén colors concrete via Sight Unseen
5. Talking with painter Samantha French via The Jealous Curator
6. Empowering refugees through design via Trendland
7. Katerina Belkina’s self-portraits that emulate the masters via Miss Moss
8. An interview with painter Andrea Shaw via The Design Files
9. Maria Gil Ulldemolins’ meditative paintings via Design Crush
10. Carson Ellis‘ lovely wallpaper designs for Portland’s Juju Papers via design*sponge
11. Johannes Mundinger’s colorful murals via Hi-Fructose
12. A surreal stained-glass amoeba in the forest via booooooom

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

February 23rd, 2016

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This week’s gallery picks dip into the environments we create and inhibit.

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1. Twelve artists explore the psychological impact of recreating the world in tiny proportion and offer viewers an opportunity to Feel Big, Live Small in this multi-media exhibition. This display includes more than twenty works of art comprised of three-dimensional miniatures as well as photographs, digital images and video created with miniature sets at The Mini Time Machine
2. Artist and ocean advocate Courtney Mattison creates large scale ceramic installations and sculptures inspired by science and marine biology. Her intricate hand-crafted porcelain works celebrate the fragile beauty of endangered coral reef ecosystems and promote awareness to conserve and protect our natural world at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art
3. The ocean makes up 71 percent of our planet’s surface. So, how is it that we know more about Mars than the marine environments of Earth? As impenetrable as the deep oceans are to humans, we imperviously live in a black box of international shipping, reducing the ocean to a surface rather than an environmental force. Martin Zurkow’s MORE&MORE is a socioeconomic, post-natural foray into the infrastructure of global trade: a systemic means to a never-ending end of economic growth at bitforms gallery
4. In his new body of work, Jason Salavon explores the ways in which infinite variation and permutation—supercharged by large networks—is the engine of our exploding digitized culture. Debuting 14 new works in a variety of media, the artist furthers his investigation of the vast visual capacity engendered by an ever-advancing social and technological landscape. With an emphasis on the recent massive exponential growth of digital data, Salavon uses pop cultural touchstones to guide us through various examples of the unbounded possibilities of this phenomenon at Mark Moore Gallery
5. Jenny Odell and Philip Buscemi create The Bureau of Suspended Objects, a series of window-like displays of objects in a cabinet of curiosities manner. Following a residency at Recology SF, Odell’s work has focused on the ways in which manufactured objects circulate from the factory to our homes, and how our sentimental attachment to objects changes their initial commercial value. The objects (whether brand new, in-use, or trash) become tools for an investigation into the ways we invest and divest values into and from material goods, and ultimately on the powers of visual merchandising at Contemporary Jewish Museum
6. Simon Evans misappropriates various characteristic tools for the objective depiction of reality, so as to compose radically subjective work. Embodying forms of dialogue between his interiority and the world, his pieces act as much as a research for the meaning to allot to individual experience, as a permanent exercise in the re-appropriation of the everyday at Palais de Tokyo

Friday Quick Links!

February 19th, 2016

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1. Behind the masks of West Africa via CNN
2. Inside the studio of ceramicist Holly Macdonald via The Design Files
3. How to make paper hellebores via design*sponge
4. Have fun with this DIY candlestick cake stand via Poppytalk
5. Love wallpaper, but living in a rental? via Oh Joy!
6. Wanted all of Semikah Textiles’s rugs, pillows and baskets via Honestly WTF
7. Not your usual basketball hoops via Hi-Fructose
8. These Eco Deer wall planters via Miss Moss
9. Making wallpaper in the 1960’s via Colossal
10. Zodiac piñatas! via The House that Lars Built
11. Sharon Muir stunning earthy yet graphic vessels via Design Crush
12. The bond between Haute Couture and prêt-à-porter via Yatzer

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

February 17th, 2016

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This week’s gallery picks examine the art of science and technology.

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1. Louise Despont’s Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture examines the movement of energy at The Drawing Center
2. For Lights Out, Michael Kagan reinforces his fascination with man’s moments of triumph over nature’s limits captured through iconic imagery at Joshua Liner Gallery
3. Larissa Fassler’s work is constructed out of a mass of topographic tracking, sketches, observations, and feelings that she experiences on site, and that are then synthesized into large graphic compositions, models, and sculptures at Jérôme Poggi Gallery
4. Agostino Arrivabene’s approach to painting stems from his artistic influences Gustave Moreau and Odd Nerdrum. He follows traditional methods that include grinding his own pigments and the almost forgotten technique of mischtechnik. This attention to the minutiae has resulted in Arrivabene’s paintings actually embodying a process of alchemical transformation, in which the physical matter of painting itself is transmuted into extraordinary light-filled visions at Cara Gallery
5. Felipe Pantone’s “W3-DIMENSIONAL” takes inspiration from Teilhard de Chardin’s 1950’s theories, which postulated the existence of “an enveloping sphere of thought, a living tissue of consciousness, enclosing the Earth and growing ever more dense.” at Mirus Gallery
6. Laura Poitras’ Astro Noise examines our modern era of mass surveillance at Whitney Museum of American Art

Friday Quick Links!

February 12th, 2016

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1. Windows of the world by André Vincente Gonçalves via Creative Boom
2. Sweet DIY heart tea candles via design*sponge
3. Matthieu Bourel’s mixed media collage and digital art via Trendland
4. Marcin Rusak encases flowers in resin via Yellowtrace
5. Christina Bothwell’s dream-like sculptures of glass and stone via Hi-Fructose
6. Love these space tourism posters via The Verge
7. Loving the traditional embroidery employed in Mochi’s designs via Honestly WTF
8. Ceramic objects imprinted with letters & numbers from typewriter keys via Colossal
9. A day in the life of illustrator Jeffrey Phillips via The Design Files
10. Asya Kozina’s baroque wigs made entirely out of paper via Slate
11. Cute DIY wood-burned bottle stoppers via A Beautiful Mess
12. Tiny paper houses by Mar Cerdà via The Jealous Curator

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

February 9th, 2016

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This week’s artists challenge limits and the manner in which we look at things.

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1. The works in Salmon Eye feature a unique marriage of Eddie Martinez’s gifts as a draftsman and a painter.  Many of the paintings in the exhibition originated as small, sharpie drawings on paper.  The drawings are enlarged and silkscreened onto the canvas. Using this black silkscreen as a starting-point, Martinez then builds up shapes and layers, sometimes using the outline of the silkscreen as a formal blueprint, or sometimes disregarding the lines or covering them entirely at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
2. Patrick Brennan’s Up Against Natureconcerns ideas around the natural world and its limits – promoting an experience that comes out of looking at the landscape but also questioning our connection to it. Confronting the natural world with a synthetic dream-like version of its self, these paintings decontextualize our understanding of traditionally perceived ideas around the sublime at Essex Flowers
3. Ellen Berkenblit’s paintings are vibrant celebrations of color – neon greens, pinks, blues, and oranges are cut and shaped with an array of blacks that reveal the artist’s dedication to mixing her own colors as she works. Berkenblit’s practice complicates the polarity between representation and abstraction. Through her capricious application of paint and calligraphic line, she creates a wickedly comical atmosphere where cartoonish representation and serious abstraction fuse and overlap at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects
4. Betty Woodman’s Breakfast At The Seashore Lunch In Antella challenges the eye to reconcile two- and three-dimensional spaces simultaneously: flat tables battle the perspectival architecture that surrounds them for perceptual dominance. Each painting is a window into a realm of vibrant possibility, one in which idealized, even abstract, beauty reaches its highest expression in the tactile, utilitarian, and embodied objects and activities of everyday life at Salon 94
5. Ted Gahl, Shara Hughes and Christoph Roßner’s work all exist in the borderland between representation and abstraction. With deft understanding of painterly tradition, these three artists confidently and independently traverse the pictorial plane, adding their own personal interpretation. The paintings feel as if they are in this cyclical feedback with their maker, without concern for a viewer, while simultaneously rewarding any viewer who looks at Romer Young Gallery
6. In Andrew Holmquist’s STAGE LEFT painting is re-conceived as a tool or device for exploring the way that other mediums – film, costuming, comic books and ceramic sculptures – can meld together to assemble a fictionalized alternative to reality at Carrie Secrist Gallery

 

Babies, Bobo Choses + Spanish Fashion

February 8th, 2016

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Bobo Choses is a children’s line located in Spain just outside of Barcelona. Co-founded by Adriana Esperalba, the brand aims to create durable and artful pieces every season. We’re particularly keen on the patterns and silhouettes, as they’re bold, unique and comfortable(!) The Bobo goal is a beautiful one, to capture the magical, passionate look and language of children. While the pieces are upscale, they make for beautiful gifts and the occasional splurge. We’re big fans.

 

CATEGORIES:  BabyChildrensFashion
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Friday Quick Links!

February 5th, 2016

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1. If only all taxis were similarly decorated via Colossal
2. Ceramicist Louise Kyriakou has a thing about faces via The Design Files
3. Love this beautiful geometric guilt from Daniel DuGoff via Sight Unseen
4. Carina Shoshtary turns graffitied walls into jewelry via Design Crush
5. You can’t help but want to touch Calvin Ross Carl’s art via The Jealous Curator
6. Alexandra Kehayoglou brings the outdoors in with her dreamy rugs via Trendland
7.Neat DIY neon sign via Honestly WTF
8. Make an anti-conversation heart sweater via Lovely Indeed
9. How about black bathroom fixtures? via Miss Moss
10. Chatting with Serge and Ann of Slowstitch Studio via design*sponge
11. An interview with Malika Favre via Creative Boom
12. teamLab’s magical digital installation via Hi-Fructose

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

February 2nd, 2016

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The art is this week’s gallery picks is all about focus and shifts in practice and process.

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1. Steve Roden went a year without painting and then began again at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects
2. Subliminal Shifts unveils an assemblage of artists living and working in New York, Berlin, Paris, and Chicago, all of who predominantly practice an abstract idiom, investigating paint through a lens that is entirely distinct at Tracy Williams, Ltd
3. In “Voyeur”, Vanessa Prager installs sixteen new paintings, some viewable only through a tiny peephole. Prager paints dense and furry oil paintings that relish in the peaks and valleys of extruded oil paint. With multiple colors of paint on the brush she blends pigment not just in the X or Y dimensions but gravity-defyingly outward into the Z. Her subject is the face, and her technique creates an image that hovers between figuration and abstraction in a sort of non-image at The Hole
4. Margo Wolowiec’s Double Blind expands upon her distinct woven practice with three new freestanding sculptures grounded by a large double-paneled wall work. In this body of work, the artist continues her examination of digitally sourced images while presenting the viewer with a conflicted field of doubles through the artist’s process of dye sublimation transfer onto polymer threads and weaving them together on a handloom at Anat Ebgi
5. Emanuel Röhss’ new works in Invitation to Love stem from the artist’s recent examination of the relationship between the Hollywood entertainment industry and the Ennis House in Los Angeles, designed by architect Frank Lloyd Wright. The exhibition’s title is borrowed from the name of a fictional soap opera which appears in the TV series Twin Peaks at Thomas Duncan Gallery
6. Further Notice presents new figurative and abstract paintings in Wayne Herpich’s distinctly rigorous technique, one where he employs a series of reiterative horizontal, sometimes layered, wavelike forms across the surface of the canvas. In full command of his often bombastic decisions in pigment, patterning, and texture, Herpich creates masterful, dissonant, compelling, complex and innovative works that resist classification at Blackston Gallery

 

Friday Quick Links!

January 29th, 2016

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1. Fascinated by these material experiments from Hilda Hellstrom via Trendland
2. Oh the wanderlust inspired by Nicola Odemann’s photos via Miss Moss
3. A house made entirely of cardboard via Hi-Fructose
4. Swooning for the Rayleigh Table Lamp via Design Crush
5. Pairing fashionably clothed bodies with botanical bouquets via Honestly WTF
6. Kostas Neofitidis’ art panels with colorful, positive messages via Yatzer
7. In love with this painted armoire via Poppytalk
8. Interview with the gents behind design studio Dowel Jones via The Design Files
9. DIY marbled clay hooks via design*sponge
10. Ai Weiwei’s paper dragons inside Paris’s Le Bon Marché via Colossal
11. Talking with Leah Giberson via The Jealous Curator
12. Javier de Riba paints elaborate flooring in deserted areas via design-milk

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

January 26th, 2016

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We’re exploring identity and culture through the body in this week’s gallery picks.

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1. Bring it Home: (Re)Locating Cultural Legacy through the Body presents work from artists representing diverse Bay Area communities, and centers thematically on how these artists grapple with cultural identity and its relationship to the human condition at San Francisco Arts Commission Galleries
2. In Katherine Bradford’s Fear of Waves , painting and swimming share immersion and a certain loss of control that is simultaneously wild and structured. The body in nature; we see ourselves situated in relationship to the deep other at Canada New York
3. The compelling work and storyof Vivian Maier at Merry Karnowsky Gallery
4. Tattooing in London has a long and rich history, dating back to a time before Captain Cook made his adventures to the Pacific. Tattoo London will offer insight into the history of professional tattooing in London as well as revealing life inside four contemporary tattoo studios in the capital via Museum of London
5. Expanding on her language that traditionally highlights misfits, outcasts, and the misunderstood – Allison Schulnik introduces a wild new cast of mythological creatures replete with centaurettes, unicorns, and otherworldly outsiders in various stages of liberation. Continuing her exploration of selfhood through diverse and rich allegories, her new subjects radiate gracefulness that is both vulnerable and stoic—a type of synthesis that is a hallmark in Schulnik’s work at Mark Moore Gallery
6. Lani Emmanuel’s figures of young women portray emotion and identity by focusing on body language, gesture and gaze. She captures each figure’s self-expression through their wardrobe. For most adolescent girls, fashion is a means of self-expression that allows for identity experimentation at Lora Schlesinger Gallery

 

Rebecca Atwood for Method Soap

January 25th, 2016

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Most people in the design and homegoods space are familiar with Rebecca Atwood’s stunning watercolors. Her nature-inspired patterns evoke calming worlds through soft dyes and beautiful handmade shapes. Recently, though instagram, I came across her most recent commercial collaboration – a limited edition packaging partnership with Method Soap.

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Method is a simple, design-forward, no-fuss brand. It’s made it’s mark riding the transparency wave over the past few years and has become a trusted name in the bathroom and cleaning supply industry. It’s fun to see them branch out a bit and experiment with a high-end pattern collaboration. This one in particular feels extremely appropriate, as many of Atwood’s watercolors have a fluidity that feels right for a liquids-based company. If you’re looking to add subtle organic patterns to you home, this is an easy win/win solution.

 

Welcome! I’m Shayna.
I live in New York and curate Pattern Pulp Studios. We're trend forecasters connecting the dots between culture and commerce, helping companies navigate digital and physical opportunities. This blog gives a daily taste of what we're seeing. If you want to learn more about how we can help your brand, or just to say hello, drop us a line - we'd love to hear from you!
 
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