PATTERN PULP

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

March 15th, 2016

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In this week’s gallery picks, women play the narrative.

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1. Susanna Bauer and Leigh Anne Lester’s muses are the found fallen leaves, and the buds of flowers that haven’t fully grown.  Marrying both human and nature again, their work is a tribute to nature at Muriel Guépin Gallery
2. Carrie Moyer’s Sirens explores and extends the legacy of American Abstraction while paying homage to many of its seminal female figures among them Helen Frankenthaler, Elizabeth Murray, and Georgia O’Keeffe. In Moyer’s compositions color is the sole character, playing every role: energy, matter, ooze, architecture, the cosmic and the cosmos. Through her use of gravity, velocity and stasis Moyer transforms and frees vivid primary hues to express new kinds of animation or fullness, which in turn propels Moyer’s ongoing exploration of her medium at DC Moore Gallery
3. Anna Elise Johnson collects official photographs taken during meetings between the leaders of the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, the U.S. State Department and various heads of state undergoing structural adjustment. Johnson’s acrylic sculptures structurally readjust the photographs that represent, support and solidify these imperial operations. at The Mission
4. Through nearly 100 works made by 34 artists over the past seventy years, this ambitious exhibition traces ways in which women have changed the course of art by deftly transforming the language of sculpture since the postwar period at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel
5. In new paintings and collages, Karen Kilimnik creates richly enigmatic narratives, inscribing her images with signifiers that obliquely reference histories of representation and myth. Mining the vernacular of tapestry reproductions of Baroque and Renaissance painting imagery, Kilimnik doubles down on the expressive potential of the reproduction, rendering her scenes with patchy brushwork and sprinkling her finished paintings with glitter, or adorning them with selections culled from from her library of idiomatic imagery at 303 Gallery
6. JOAN BROWN HERSELF is a survey of eleven self-portraits made between 1970 and 1980, the period during which Brown firmly established herself as an artist with a unique vision at CB1 Gallery

Friday Quick Links!

March 11th, 2016

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1. Dorothy O’Connor’s gorgeous installations via Creative Boom
2.. The impressive work and life of Lillian Orlowsky via design*sponge
3. Chatting with artist Rebecca Leveille via Hi-Fructose
4. These knotted cushions and stools look like so much fun via design-milk
5. Kidswear by Bobo Choses that we wish came in adult sizes via Miss Moss
6. A visit with Misha Kahn in his studio via Sight Unseen
7. Why not decoupage your Easter Eggs this year? via Poppytalk
8. Mar Cerdà’s miniatures made from watercolor painted paper via Honestly WTF
9. In love with Anna Collette Hunt’s ceramic insects via Colossal
10. Spencer Harrison explores Synesthesia in his latest works via The Design Files
11. Anne Siems’ beautiful and ethereal paintings via The Jealous Curator
12. Ori Gersht’s captivating On Reflection via Design Crush

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

March 8th, 2016

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Contemplating patterns and paths in this week’s gallery picks.

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1. Jerry Carniglia’s process-driven methods and exploratory nature parallel his constant and evolving search for meaning that may be found in the unseen and otherwise unarticulated structures that underlie all of existence at Chandra Cerrito Contemporary
2. In Esmé Thompson’s paintings and multi-panel wall reliefs the use of color and pattern create a dynamic and engaging viewing experience.  Colorful and bold, the paintings attest to a lifelong interest in decorative designs as diverse as those found in Islamic textiles and ceramic tiles to those of medieval paintings and illuminated manuscripts at Bowery Gallery
3. In 1905, Hilma af Klint received a ‘commission’ from an entity to create her most important body of work, The Paintings for the Temple. Consisting of 193 predominately abstract paintings in various series and subgroups, the artist painted a path towards a harmony between the spiritual and material worlds; good and evil; man and woman; religion and science at Serpentine Galleries
4. Nathan Hayden (b. 1977) dances each day to induce visions that he draws on small pieces of thick torn paper referred to as “the cards”. The shapes and geometric patterns he derives from inner and outer landscapes bounce between abstraction and figurative representation, resulting in drawings that explore personal mythologies and hallucinations. Hayden’s latest series of paintings for Pure Pretty Fever depicts hallucinatory landscapes at CB1Gallery
5. Robin Mitchell’s intensely colorful paintings are a combination of stitch-like marks layered over radiating imagery. Her exhibition, How Many Heartbeats in a Lifetime?, continues a line of visual thinking that has progressed through her previous four exhibitions at Craig Krull Gallery
6. Donald Groscost creates large paintings that challenge the viewer’s perception of the traditional medium. The show will feature his earlier works executed in the early 2000s, which are formal investigations of painterly abstraction and the process of image simulation in our digitized era. His oils on canvas deceivingly appear to be created by some form of virtual media, with a vibrancy of palette that only heightens the impression of a mechanically transmitted image at Heather Gaudio Fine Art

Friday Quick Links!

March 4th, 2016

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1. Ingrid Bugge,’s beautiful ballet photographs via Trendland
2. Doug Fogelson’s mesmerizing photograms of natural specimens via HI-Fructose
3. Sebastian Erras’ series Barcelona Floors via Design Boom
4. Stéphanie Caulier‘s oversized hand knits look so cozy! via Honestly WTF
5. Kangan Arora’s Punjab inspired textiles via AnOther Mag
6. Creating Loving Van Gogh via Colossal
7. A fan of Janelle Pietrzak’s textile art via Sight Unseen
8. Talking with artist Xochi Solis via The Jealous Curator
9. What do you think about quilted coats? via The House that Lars Built
10. Inigo Elizalde’s environment inspired abstract graphic rugs via design-milk
11. Interview with Clea Cregan of Miniscapes via The Design Files
12. On shooting for The 1975 via Creative Review

Contributed by Emily Gup

Friday Quick Links!

February 26th, 2016

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1. The amazing tiled ceilings of centuries old mosques via Colossal
2. Turning freighter trucks into mobile art via design boom
3. Alexandra Kehayoglou’s creation of a magical fashion runway via Honestly WTF
4. Digging the way Erika Emerén colors concrete via Sight Unseen
5. Talking with painter Samantha French via The Jealous Curator
6. Empowering refugees through design via Trendland
7. Katerina Belkina’s self-portraits that emulate the masters via Miss Moss
8. An interview with painter Andrea Shaw via The Design Files
9. Maria Gil Ulldemolins’ meditative paintings via Design Crush
10. Carson Ellis‘ lovely wallpaper designs for Portland’s Juju Papers via design*sponge
11. Johannes Mundinger’s colorful murals via Hi-Fructose
12. A surreal stained-glass amoeba in the forest via booooooom

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

February 23rd, 2016

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This week’s gallery picks dip into the environments we create and inhibit.

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1. Twelve artists explore the psychological impact of recreating the world in tiny proportion and offer viewers an opportunity to Feel Big, Live Small in this multi-media exhibition. This display includes more than twenty works of art comprised of three-dimensional miniatures as well as photographs, digital images and video created with miniature sets at The Mini Time Machine
2. Artist and ocean advocate Courtney Mattison creates large scale ceramic installations and sculptures inspired by science and marine biology. Her intricate hand-crafted porcelain works celebrate the fragile beauty of endangered coral reef ecosystems and promote awareness to conserve and protect our natural world at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art
3. The ocean makes up 71 percent of our planet’s surface. So, how is it that we know more about Mars than the marine environments of Earth? As impenetrable as the deep oceans are to humans, we imperviously live in a black box of international shipping, reducing the ocean to a surface rather than an environmental force. Martin Zurkow’s MORE&MORE is a socioeconomic, post-natural foray into the infrastructure of global trade: a systemic means to a never-ending end of economic growth at bitforms gallery
4. In his new body of work, Jason Salavon explores the ways in which infinite variation and permutation—supercharged by large networks—is the engine of our exploding digitized culture. Debuting 14 new works in a variety of media, the artist furthers his investigation of the vast visual capacity engendered by an ever-advancing social and technological landscape. With an emphasis on the recent massive exponential growth of digital data, Salavon uses pop cultural touchstones to guide us through various examples of the unbounded possibilities of this phenomenon at Mark Moore Gallery
5. Jenny Odell and Philip Buscemi create The Bureau of Suspended Objects, a series of window-like displays of objects in a cabinet of curiosities manner. Following a residency at Recology SF, Odell’s work has focused on the ways in which manufactured objects circulate from the factory to our homes, and how our sentimental attachment to objects changes their initial commercial value. The objects (whether brand new, in-use, or trash) become tools for an investigation into the ways we invest and divest values into and from material goods, and ultimately on the powers of visual merchandising at Contemporary Jewish Museum
6. Simon Evans misappropriates various characteristic tools for the objective depiction of reality, so as to compose radically subjective work. Embodying forms of dialogue between his interiority and the world, his pieces act as much as a research for the meaning to allot to individual experience, as a permanent exercise in the re-appropriation of the everyday at Palais de Tokyo

Friday Quick Links!

February 19th, 2016

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1. Behind the masks of West Africa via CNN
2. Inside the studio of ceramicist Holly Macdonald via The Design Files
3. How to make paper hellebores via design*sponge
4. Have fun with this DIY candlestick cake stand via Poppytalk
5. Love wallpaper, but living in a rental? via Oh Joy!
6. Wanted all of Semikah Textiles’s rugs, pillows and baskets via Honestly WTF
7. Not your usual basketball hoops via Hi-Fructose
8. These Eco Deer wall planters via Miss Moss
9. Making wallpaper in the 1960’s via Colossal
10. Zodiac piñatas! via The House that Lars Built
11. Sharon Muir stunning earthy yet graphic vessels via Design Crush
12. The bond between Haute Couture and prêt-à-porter via Yatzer

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

February 17th, 2016

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This week’s gallery picks examine the art of science and technology.

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1. Louise Despont’s Energy Scaffolds and Information Architecture examines the movement of energy at The Drawing Center
2. For Lights Out, Michael Kagan reinforces his fascination with man’s moments of triumph over nature’s limits captured through iconic imagery at Joshua Liner Gallery
3. Larissa Fassler’s work is constructed out of a mass of topographic tracking, sketches, observations, and feelings that she experiences on site, and that are then synthesized into large graphic compositions, models, and sculptures at Jérôme Poggi Gallery
4. Agostino Arrivabene’s approach to painting stems from his artistic influences Gustave Moreau and Odd Nerdrum. He follows traditional methods that include grinding his own pigments and the almost forgotten technique of mischtechnik. This attention to the minutiae has resulted in Arrivabene’s paintings actually embodying a process of alchemical transformation, in which the physical matter of painting itself is transmuted into extraordinary light-filled visions at Cara Gallery
5. Felipe Pantone’s “W3-DIMENSIONAL” takes inspiration from Teilhard de Chardin’s 1950’s theories, which postulated the existence of “an enveloping sphere of thought, a living tissue of consciousness, enclosing the Earth and growing ever more dense.” at Mirus Gallery
6. Laura Poitras’ Astro Noise examines our modern era of mass surveillance at Whitney Museum of American Art

Friday Quick Links!

February 12th, 2016

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1. Windows of the world by André Vincente Gonçalves via Creative Boom
2. Sweet DIY heart tea candles via design*sponge
3. Matthieu Bourel’s mixed media collage and digital art via Trendland
4. Marcin Rusak encases flowers in resin via Yellowtrace
5. Christina Bothwell’s dream-like sculptures of glass and stone via Hi-Fructose
6. Love these space tourism posters via The Verge
7. Loving the traditional embroidery employed in Mochi’s designs via Honestly WTF
8. Ceramic objects imprinted with letters & numbers from typewriter keys via Colossal
9. A day in the life of illustrator Jeffrey Phillips via The Design Files
10. Asya Kozina’s baroque wigs made entirely out of paper via Slate
11. Cute DIY wood-burned bottle stoppers via A Beautiful Mess
12. Tiny paper houses by Mar Cerdà via The Jealous Curator

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday’s Gallery Picks

February 9th, 2016

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This week’s artists challenge limits and the manner in which we look at things.

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1. The works in Salmon Eye feature a unique marriage of Eddie Martinez’s gifts as a draftsman and a painter.  Many of the paintings in the exhibition originated as small, sharpie drawings on paper.  The drawings are enlarged and silkscreened onto the canvas. Using this black silkscreen as a starting-point, Martinez then builds up shapes and layers, sometimes using the outline of the silkscreen as a formal blueprint, or sometimes disregarding the lines or covering them entirely at Mitchell-Innes & Nash
2. Patrick Brennan’s Up Against Natureconcerns ideas around the natural world and its limits – promoting an experience that comes out of looking at the landscape but also questioning our connection to it. Confronting the natural world with a synthetic dream-like version of its self, these paintings decontextualize our understanding of traditionally perceived ideas around the sublime at Essex Flowers
3. Ellen Berkenblit’s paintings are vibrant celebrations of color – neon greens, pinks, blues, and oranges are cut and shaped with an array of blacks that reveal the artist’s dedication to mixing her own colors as she works. Berkenblit’s practice complicates the polarity between representation and abstraction. Through her capricious application of paint and calligraphic line, she creates a wickedly comical atmosphere where cartoonish representation and serious abstraction fuse and overlap at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects
4. Betty Woodman’s Breakfast At The Seashore Lunch In Antella challenges the eye to reconcile two- and three-dimensional spaces simultaneously: flat tables battle the perspectival architecture that surrounds them for perceptual dominance. Each painting is a window into a realm of vibrant possibility, one in which idealized, even abstract, beauty reaches its highest expression in the tactile, utilitarian, and embodied objects and activities of everyday life at Salon 94
5. Ted Gahl, Shara Hughes and Christoph Roßner’s work all exist in the borderland between representation and abstraction. With deft understanding of painterly tradition, these three artists confidently and independently traverse the pictorial plane, adding their own personal interpretation. The paintings feel as if they are in this cyclical feedback with their maker, without concern for a viewer, while simultaneously rewarding any viewer who looks at Romer Young Gallery
6. In Andrew Holmquist’s STAGE LEFT painting is re-conceived as a tool or device for exploring the way that other mediums – film, costuming, comic books and ceramic sculptures – can meld together to assemble a fictionalized alternative to reality at Carrie Secrist Gallery

 

Babies, Bobo Choses + Spanish Fashion

February 8th, 2016

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Bobo Choses is a children’s line located in Spain just outside of Barcelona. Co-founded by Adriana Esperalba, the brand aims to create durable and artful pieces every season. We’re particularly keen on the patterns and silhouettes, as they’re bold, unique and comfortable(!) The Bobo goal is a beautiful one, to capture the magical, passionate look and language of children. While the pieces are upscale, they make for beautiful gifts and the occasional splurge. We’re big fans.

 

CATEGORIES:  BabyChildrensFashion
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Friday Quick Links!

February 5th, 2016

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1. If only all taxis were similarly decorated via Colossal
2. Ceramicist Louise Kyriakou has a thing about faces via The Design Files
3. Love this beautiful geometric guilt from Daniel DuGoff via Sight Unseen
4. Carina Shoshtary turns graffitied walls into jewelry via Design Crush
5. You can’t help but want to touch Calvin Ross Carl’s art via The Jealous Curator
6. Alexandra Kehayoglou brings the outdoors in with her dreamy rugs via Trendland
7.Neat DIY neon sign via Honestly WTF
8. Make an anti-conversation heart sweater via Lovely Indeed
9. How about black bathroom fixtures? via Miss Moss
10. Chatting with Serge and Ann of Slowstitch Studio via design*sponge
11. An interview with Malika Favre via Creative Boom
12. teamLab’s magical digital installation via Hi-Fructose

Contributed by Emily Gup

Welcome! I’m Shayna.
I live in New York and curate Pattern Pulp Studios. We're trend forecasters connecting the dots between culture and commerce, helping companies navigate digital and physical opportunities. This blog gives a daily taste of what we're seeing. If you want to learn more about how we can help your brand, or just to say hello, drop us a line - we'd love to hear from you!
 
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