Pattern Pulp

Tuesday's Gallery Picks




gallerypicks_patternpulp149

This week’s artists take things apart to put them back together.

*            *            *

1. In drawing from the urban storefront and its familiar yet overlooked signage, Brice Bischoff’s installation of photographic and architectural structures, videos and fiberglass sculptures considers how the experience of place is shaped by way of light, reflection and architecture at Cirrus Gallery
2. Jason Middlebrook’s signature towering “Plank” paintings are geometric abstractions painted directly onto internally cut trunks from the local mill in Hudson New York. Middlebrook’s signature patterning weds the geometry of modern abstraction with the lines of wood grain to “create a tension between something organic and something man-made.” at Gallery 16
3. WILDSCAPES examines two distinguished artistic approaches to depictions of nature, with a focus on ecological (dis)balance between the natural and the man made world. By utilizing different materials, aesthetic approaches and iconographies, Ivan Stojakovic and Paula Winokur deliver compelling takes on wilderness and its fragility and/or pertinence within contemporary cultural context. They reinvent the notion of the sublime, dwell on the ways both nature and culture are fabricated, contemplate on their coexistence and clashes, and call for reflection on the existential and ecological issues of our times at Christian Duvernois Gallery
4. Arman’s Accumulations features around forty historical sculptures produced between 1960 and 1964. In his quest to construct an ‘archaeology of the present’, Arman created an artistic language that had a deep-reaching effect on contemporary art. The Accumulations explore the loss of individual identity and the neutralization of human interactions by consumer society, the violence of abundance and the aesthetics of rubbish at Galerie Daniel Templon
5. Extending and intensifying the method of image making (and unmaking) that he has employed for a decade, John Sparagana has spent the last two years deep in the comics, with very serious results. His most ambitious and accomplished work to date, the Themesong Variation works, which are technically cut paper collage of 1/8-inch squares mixed and laid down onto Dibond aluminum, open a whole new universe of potential for image intervention and reinvention at Corbett vs. Dempsey
6. Roddy Wildeman sees beauty in distressed and damaged surfaces and works solely with materials fitting that description. The two main focuses of Wildeman’s work are historic preservation and sustainability. He collects wood from a majority of buildings that are over one-hundred years old and have a legacy of sentimental value attached to them.Everything that enters his studio gets incorporated into a phase of his process and his studio functions at a 100% sustainable level. Committed to his social responsibility to reuse and recycle, Wildeman views his practice as an effort to preserve our environment at Jonathan Levine Gallery

Friday Quick Links!




pattern-wrapup_350

1. Okuda San Miguel transformed this abandoned Moroccan church via Colossal
2. DIY succulent sand art terrarium via Honestly WTF
3. A fan of Kirkland Bray’s collages via The Jealous Curator
4. Charles Clary’s drywall and wallpaper installations via iGNANT
5. The artistry of African Masking via AnOther
6. Talking with Loly Ghirardi about her beautiful embroidery via Poppytalk
7. Curating the nude via Miss Moss
8. Loving these Indian interiors via design*sponge
9. Loving the latest home goods from Bonnie and Neil via The Design Files
10. In the studio of Paul Wackers via Sight Unseen
11. Abstract rugs inspired by biology via design-milk
12. Solar spectrum art installations in Rome via Trendland

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday's Gallery Picks




gallerypicks_patternpulp148

In this week’s gallery picks, women play the narrative.

*            *            *

1. Susanna Bauer and Leigh Anne Lester’s muses are the found fallen leaves, and the buds of flowers that haven’t fully grown.  Marrying both human and nature again, their work is a tribute to nature at Muriel Guépin Gallery
2. Carrie Moyer’s Sirens explores and extends the legacy of American Abstraction while paying homage to many of its seminal female figures among them Helen Frankenthaler, Elizabeth Murray, and Georgia O’Keeffe. In Moyer’s compositions color is the sole character, playing every role: energy, matter, ooze, architecture, the cosmic and the cosmos. Through her use of gravity, velocity and stasis Moyer transforms and frees vivid primary hues to express new kinds of animation or fullness, which in turn propels Moyer’s ongoing exploration of her medium at DC Moore Gallery
3. Anna Elise Johnson collects official photographs taken during meetings between the leaders of the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, the U.S. State Department and various heads of state undergoing structural adjustment. Johnson’s acrylic sculptures structurally readjust the photographs that represent, support and solidify these imperial operations. at The Mission
4. Through nearly 100 works made by 34 artists over the past seventy years, this ambitious exhibition traces ways in which women have changed the course of art by deftly transforming the language of sculpture since the postwar period at Hauser Wirth & Schimmel
5. In new paintings and collages, Karen Kilimnik creates richly enigmatic narratives, inscribing her images with signifiers that obliquely reference histories of representation and myth. Mining the vernacular of tapestry reproductions of Baroque and Renaissance painting imagery, Kilimnik doubles down on the expressive potential of the reproduction, rendering her scenes with patchy brushwork and sprinkling her finished paintings with glitter, or adorning them with selections culled from from her library of idiomatic imagery at 303 Gallery
6. JOAN BROWN HERSELF is a survey of eleven self-portraits made between 1970 and 1980, the period during which Brown firmly established herself as an artist with a unique vision at CB1 Gallery

Friday Quick Links!




pattern-wrapup_349
1. Dorothy O’Connor’s gorgeous installations via Creative Boom
2.. The impressive work and life of Lillian Orlowsky via design*sponge
3. Chatting with artist Rebecca Leveille via Hi-Fructose
4. These knotted cushions and stools look like so much fun via design-milk
5. Kidswear by Bobo Choses that we wish came in adult sizes via Miss Moss
6. A visit with Misha Kahn in his studio via Sight Unseen
7. Why not decoupage your Easter Eggs this year? via Poppytalk
8. Mar Cerdà’s miniatures made from watercolor painted paper via Honestly WTF
9. In love with Anna Collette Hunt’s ceramic insects via Colossal
10. Spencer Harrison explores Synesthesia in his latest works via The Design Files
11. Anne Siems’ beautiful and ethereal paintings via The Jealous Curator
12. Ori Gersht’s captivating On Reflection via Design Crush

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tuesday's Gallery Picks




gallerypicks_patternpulp147

Contemplating patterns and paths in this week’s gallery picks.

*            *            *

1. Jerry Carniglia’s process-driven methods and exploratory nature parallel his constant and evolving search for meaning that may be found in the unseen and otherwise unarticulated structures that underlie all of existence at Chandra Cerrito Contemporary
2. In Esmé Thompson’s paintings and multi-panel wall reliefs the use of color and pattern create a dynamic and engaging viewing experience.  Colorful and bold, the paintings attest to a lifelong interest in decorative designs as diverse as those found in Islamic textiles and ceramic tiles to those of medieval paintings and illuminated manuscripts at Bowery Gallery
3. In 1905, Hilma af Klint received a ‘commission’ from an entity to create her most important body of work, The Paintings for the Temple. Consisting of 193 predominately abstract paintings in various series and subgroups, the artist painted a path towards a harmony between the spiritual and material worlds; good and evil; man and woman; religion and science at Serpentine Galleries
4. Nathan Hayden (b. 1977) dances each day to induce visions that he draws on small pieces of thick torn paper referred to as “the cards”. The shapes and geometric patterns he derives from inner and outer landscapes bounce between abstraction and figurative representation, resulting in drawings that explore personal mythologies and hallucinations. Hayden’s latest series of paintings for Pure Pretty Fever depicts hallucinatory landscapes at CB1Gallery
5. Robin Mitchell’s intensely colorful paintings are a combination of stitch-like marks layered over radiating imagery. Her exhibition, How Many Heartbeats in a Lifetime?, continues a line of visual thinking that has progressed through her previous four exhibitions at Craig Krull Gallery
6. Donald Groscost creates large paintings that challenge the viewer’s perception of the traditional medium. The show will feature his earlier works executed in the early 2000s, which are formal investigations of painterly abstraction and the process of image simulation in our digitized era. His oils on canvas deceivingly appear to be created by some form of virtual media, with a vibrancy of palette that only heightens the impression of a mechanically transmitted image at Heather Gaudio Fine Art

Friday Quick Links!




pattern-wrapup_348
1. Ingrid Bugge,’s beautiful ballet photographs via Trendland
2. Doug Fogelson’s mesmerizing photograms of natural specimens via HI-Fructose
3. Sebastian Erras’ series Barcelona Floors via Design Boom
4. Stéphanie Caulier‘s oversized hand knits look so cozy! via Honestly WTF
5. Kangan Arora’s Punjab inspired textiles via AnOther Mag
6. Creating Loving Van Gogh via Colossal
7. A fan of Janelle Pietrzak’s textile art via Sight Unseen
8. Talking with artist Xochi Solis via The Jealous Curator
9. What do you think about quilted coats? via The House that Lars Built
10. Inigo Elizalde’s environment inspired abstract graphic rugs via design-milk
11. Interview with Clea Cregan of Miniscapes via The Design Files
12. On shooting for The 1975 via Creative Review

Contributed by Emily Gup

Tracking Repetitive + Awesome.
On Instagram.