Pattern Pulp

Rebecca Atwood for Method Soap




Method-RebeccaAtwood-Collaboration3

Most people in the design and homegoods space are familiar with Rebecca Atwood’s stunning watercolors. Her nature-inspired patterns evoke calming worlds through soft dyes and beautiful handmade shapes. Recently, though instagram, I came across her most recent commercial collaboration – a limited edition packaging partnership with Method Soap.

Method-RebeccaAtwood-Collaboration2

Method is a simple, design-forward, no-fuss brand. It’s made it’s mark riding the transparency wave over the past few years and has become a trusted name in the bathroom and cleaning supply industry. It’s fun to see them branch out a bit and experiment with a high-end pattern collaboration. This one in particular feels extremely appropriate, as many of Atwood’s watercolors have a fluidity that feels right for a liquids-based company. If you’re looking to add subtle organic patterns to you home, this is an easy win/win solution.

 

Brand Collaboration: CB2 x The Hill-Side




hillside_cb2_collaboration1

During a recent perusal of CB2 on a hunt for wall shelving, I came across an interesting brand collaboration. The Hill-Side, a menswear company founded by Emil and Sandy Corillo recently teamed up with the home goods store to infuse pattern and masculine urban themes into bedding and living accessories.

hillside_cb2_collaboration2

Made locally in New York City, the brand specializes in unique patterns and selvage-themed fabric. Founded initially as a tie and handkerchief company, they’ve since expanded to mens fashion and most recently, into home goods -as  evident by this commercial partnership. The floral theme is enlarged, minimized and deconstructed in ways that feel neutral and complimentary to warm woods, leathers and stripes. I’m a big fan of the line and the varied application of pattern. Kudos to both creative teams.

 

Holiday Gift Guide for Pattern Lovers




holiday_shopping_patternpulp

We always put a little patterned guide together come holiday season and today’s post features our most recent edit. Happy shopping!

*            *            *

 

Watercolors from Quercus & Co




quercusandco_patterns

While browsing Studio Four’s designer groupings, I came across the work of Quercus and Co. Based in Australia, this home goods company boasts a collection of beautiful and delicate geometric repeats. Founded by Adam Jones, the designs are all hand-painted or drawn and printed on sustainable papers and fabrics. Click here to see his full offering – it’s a stunning collection of wallpapers, fabrics and home accessories.

 

Playful Graphics at Arro Home




1Aarro_home

The good folks at Arro Home are newish on my radar – and their products and patterns are a complete delight. Reminiscent of Japanese shapes and Scandinavian color palettes, this Melbourne-based company combines classic styles with witty designs.

2Aarro_home2arro_home3Aarro_home3arro_home

The imaginative home range includes bed linens, cushions, blankets, rugs, kitchen textiles and ceramics. Check out their site to inspect, peruse and purchase.

 

 

The Women of Al Kawtar Marrakech




1Alkawtar_Womens_Collective_Marrakesh3Alkawtar_Womens_Collective_Marrakesh

I’ve been sitting on the post for a while, but wanted to finally get it out into the world. While traveling through Marrakesh earlier this Spring, my good friend Lisa and I made a stop to an incredible non-profit for women with disabilities, called Al Kawtar. Al Kawtar was founded in 2006 and has evolved into a full-service center that includes meals, transportation, physical rehab, technical training and medical support. The women are taught how to sew and embroider and are given an opportunity to be independent and earn a salary in a safe and dignified environment.

6Alkawtar_Womens_Collective_Marrakesh4Alkawtar_Womens_Collective_Marrakesh

The visit was incredible – in that the women were extremely kind, supportive of each other and skilled at their craft. The head woman in charge walked us through the center and showed us how everything worked and what the products looked like from concept through production. She also ran us through the itemized pricing and how she managed the work flow and international orders.

5Alkawtar_Womens_Collective_Marrakesh

It was obvious there was a lot of pride in the pieces that were being made. It’s also worth noting that everything was very unique and extremely commercial. I remember seeing a stack of handbags on one of the tables – where the body of the bag was a converted Moroccan pillow case with florescent embroidered clasps and embellishments. I wanted to buy one, but was told they were part of a big order for a boutique in Paris.

8Alkawtar_Womens_Collective_Bensimon2Alkawtar_Womens_Collective_Marrakesh

I discovered on the last leg of my trip through France that this specific collection went to Bensimon’s home shop. The mark up was expectedly significant, though in all honesty, the prices seemed fair and reasonable along the production food chain. It almost seemed expensive for wholesale pricing – which was refreshing to see the collective getting a fair rate for their handmade goods.

7Alkawtar_Womens_Collective_Marrakesh

I ended up designing two bags on the fly, which surprisingly only took 24hrs to assemble. I was able to pick them up the next day before heading out and was elated with how they came out. In addition to these incredible clutches, there were embroidered friendship bracelets, pot holders, baby clothing, robes, tunics, blankets and napkins. Everything had a hint of French flair with beautifully embroidered accents. Here’s a video that shares a window into their world. If you can support Al Kawtar by visiting when you’re in Marrakesh or placing a custom order for your shop, definitely do it, you won’t be disappointed.

 

Tracking Repetitive + Awesome.
On Instagram.