Pattern Pulp

Tuesday's Gallery Picks




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In this week’s gallery picks, process, pattern and color reign supreme.

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1. Rosson Crow has long been fascinated by history and the psychology of interior spaces, and has addressed subjects as varied as French Revolutionary interiors, New York City graffiti and the films of Alfred Hitchcock in his work. This exhibition represents Crow’s response to the paintings of Florine Stettheimer and debuts a new technique of Xerox transfers layered with painting on the canvases at Sargent’s Daughters
2. Richard Hull calls his recent paintings and drawings “stolen portraits.” His crayon drawings, in particular, are portraits in the form of hairdos, each one expressing a distinct visual personality rather than a representation of a particular individual at Western Projects
3. The bold brushstrokes and swirly shapes in Yayoi Kusama latest works seem to hover between figuration and abstraction; vibrant, animated, and intense, they transcend their medium to introduce their own pictorial logic, at once contemporary and universal. As such, while they continue Kusama’s innovative exploration of form, subject matter, and space, they also represent a connection to her work from the past six decades at David Zwirner
4. In James Little’s new paintings, color and structure are critical fixations that complement his geometric pictorial style.  The edges of his vertical bands are saturated with lucid color as they give way to other patterns – chevrons, rectangles and zigzag designs of varying widths at June Kelly Gallery
5. By folding, tearing, and combining, Yun-Woo Choi obfuscates the meanings constructed in two-dimensional printed material in an attempt to deliver intuitive feelings to the viewer at Open Source Gallery
6. Carlos Estrada-Vega’s paintings are composed of more than 300 blocks of color. Considering each as an individual brushstroke, Estrada-Vega proceeds to compose his paintings intuitively, mounting these pieces onto metal plates using magnets at Margaret Thatcher Projects

Tracking Repetitive + Awesome.
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