Pattern Pulp

Interview: Matt W. Moore




It’s no secret that Matt W. Moore’s vectorfunk graphics are single-handedly influencing an entire generation of artists. His fusion of graffiti, graphic design and watercolor are upbeat, intricate and extremely brand friendly. His work has appeared in countless magazines and print campaigns, from Nike and Burton to Wired and Mountain Dew. Moore’s Design and Illustration studio, MWM Graphics, is based in Portland, Maine and exhibits in galleries throughout the world, collaborating with clients from all sectors. Moore is also Co-Founder & Designer for Glyph Cue Clothing. Check out our Q+A for a glimpse into MWM’s daily routine!

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PP:  What websites and news sources do you generally start your day with-do you have a daily routine for news/blog/information consumption?

MWM: I get at least an hour a day of Cyber Surfing in while I enjoy my morning coffee. Some of the websites I frequent:

PSFK
Format Magazine
FFFFOUND
Not Cot
Rojo Magazine
The KDU
Hype Beast

The list goes on. More and more lately, I find myself skimming my carefully curated list of Twits on Twitter. Less time scouring blogs, and more time surfing suggested links.

PP:  How did you discover your talent and how has it evolved over your creative career?

MWM: I’m not comfortable with the term “discover” when referring to talent. I’ve worked damn hard, and I have boxes full of sub-par art and design from my past to prove it. I prefer to think of it more as “nurturing” my vision and dreams. Hard work pays off. As for “evolution”, it is a constant evolution. Everything is always in flux. New ideas, new techniques, new knowledge, new dreams. This is why it is so exciting to be an artist and work as a creative. Everyday is a new adventure!

PP: Please explain your design process when approaching a new concept or product line.

MWM: My process is different for every single project, but a few things are constant. It always starts out with a dialog to make sure I understand the client’s objectives and vision. Then we draft a brief and timeline together. Then I do an exploration phase yielding multiple options. We review and open a new dialog. Then I continue working and refine, finesse, and finalize the design.

PP: What is your preferred method of design and how is it incorporated in your final product? (ie. collage, computer, handwork, etc.)

MWM: The majority of my commercial design work and apparel/textile/product graphics are created entirely with vectors in Adobe Illustrator. Some days I spend over 12 hours lost in this Vectorfunk World. It is my playground.

PP: When is the last time you took a professional/creative risk? Please explain.

MWM: Every single creative decision an artist makes should be a “risk”. If they aren’t taking risks, they are not an Artist, they are a Tradesperson. That said, a couple recent risky decisions that come to mind for me are: Launching my clothing company Glyph Cue during the Great Recession. Yikes! And last month I traveled to Paris for a month long residency at Since.Upian Gallery. I arrived with no artwork, no supplies, no sketches, no firm ideas for the new series of canvases. And my Exhibition was only 25 days away. Pressure makes diamonds!

Tracking Repetitive + Awesome.
On Instagram.